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90 Anger Journal Prompts To Help Express Your Feelings

90 Anger Journal Prompts To Help Express Your Feelings

Anger is a feeling we all experience from time to time and it can be caused by many different things.

Anger needs to be expressed. It shouldn’t be bottled up inside because sooner or later it’s going to burst out.

When someone tries to hide their anger and just keep it all inside it’s not healthy. Those feelings will fester.

Anger is a genuine and valid emotion just like sadness, happiness, and worry.

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The problem is when anger is expressed in a way that is unacceptable.

The terrible twos are a stage that all children go through. In this stage of development children often do not have language yet, or very limited language that is insufficient for expressing their needs and wishes.

Their frustration and anger is expressed through temper tantrum behavior.

We are all familiar with the parent trying to deal with the child in the grocery store who is on the floor kicking and screaming, or we have been the parent in that case. Not fun.

The fact is that it isn’t fun for the child either, and an inability to appropriately express anger doesn’t get any easier as we get older.

I once pitched a ripe banana at a door when I was very angry with my now ex-husband. Not one of my proudest moments.

Anger can stem from a number of sources, not only when we don’t get our way or feel like the other person is not hearing us.

It can also come out of trauma and grief.

The journal prompts in this article help us to work through feelings of anger.

Journal Prompts To Resonate Your Grief

The grieving process consists of five stages, the second of which is anger.

If you have experienced loss in some way, you will experience anger as part of these five stages.

If someone close to you has died or you have a close friend who has lost their partner or a child, then you are likely familiar with the anger they feel for a while.

When my dad passed away, my mom went through denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance.

We know it isn’t going to change anything, but we do feel anger toward the person for leaving us. It may seem illogical, but it is natural to feel that way for a period of time.

To work through your grief, reflecting on various things during your life together and writing about those thoughts in your journal can feel calming and bring some peace.

For example, you might write a response to this prompt: Write about where you feel your grief in your body. Where does your grief stay?

This prompt, Today, I’m having a hard time with… may help you explore those feelings of anger toward your loved one.

Sometimes, shifting your focus through journaling can be helpful.

You might respond to this prompt, What is one thing you could try to make today easier on yourself?

Read through the following list and see what prompts resonate with you and who you are feeling today.

Your feelings are genuine and valid.

RELATED: 212 Affirmations To Feel Beautiful Inside & Out

32 Journaling Prompts To Resonate Your Grieve

1. "What is a way you can celebrate your loved one’s memory? Can you plant something, cook something, watch something, volunteer something?"

2. "How did your loved one make you feel?"

3. "Describe a memory with your loved one that makes you laugh."

4. "If I could forgive myself for something, it would be…"

5. "I need less of…"

6. "Write a mantra you can return to when you feel overwhelmed by grief."

7. "Is there anyone else I know going through this right now? How can we support each other?"

8. "Make a photo collage in your journal with some of your favorite pictures of them."

9. "Write about a time you had difficulty getting along with your loved one."

10. "If I could forgive them for something, it would be…"

11. "I need more of…"

12. "Write about a time you got along well with your loved one."

13. "Today, I miss…"

14. "What is something that makes you feel taken care of?"

Anger Journal Prompts

15. "One thing I wish I could do over with them is…"

16. "Keep a running list of activities you can turn to in order to feel better."

17. "Where does your mind go when you let it wander?"

18. "What is something you wish your support system would understand?"

19. "Write about where you feel your grief in your body. Where does your grief stay?"

20. "What songs make you think of them?"

21. "I feel most connected to my loved one when…"

22. "One feeling I’ve felt coming up a lot lately is…"

23. "Do you feel comfortable asking for help? Why or why not?"

24. "Today, I’m having a hard time with…"

25. "One thing I want to remember about them is…"

26. "Write down a list of people you can turn to for support, either in person or virtually."

27. "If you could tell your loved one about your day, what would you tell them?"

28. "Describe a memory with your loved one that makes you cry."

29. "What was their favorite holiday?"

30. "What is something you wish your support system could help with."

31. "What is one thing you could try to make today easier on yourself?"

32. "One cause they were passionate about is…"

Anger Journal Prompts

Journal Prompts To Learn From Past Trauma

Much is being learned about trauma and its effects on us many years down the road.

Mental health experts now know that much of the mental health issues they have seen and continue to deal with are rooted in trauma.

In order to understand how journaling can help those who suffer from trauma-based anger, we need to first understand what trauma is.

Trauma is the lasting emotional effect of an event or events over a period of time that cause distress.

One of the side effects of trauma can be the inability to control emotions.

Anger is one of the emotions that a person who has suffered trauma may have trouble controlling.

During the years I spent in education, I came across children and youth who had been traumatized, and the inability to regulate their emotions was readily apparent.

This would cause them difficulty in classes as they could not control their temper which would frequently result in their being removed from class that period.

Fortunately, there is more help available for those who have been traumatized.

Journaling provides a non-threatening means of dealing with past trauma. The prompts in the list below invite you to explore your feelings and how your past has influenced you.

Some of the prompts urge you to think about other ways to express your anger which will not have such negative effects on relationships, school, and work.

Prompts like the following get you thinking about, Why do I still hold anger and resentment?

Another prompt asks, Is there still healing that needs to take place?

These are difficult questions to wrestle with, but the reflecting they give rise to can yield beneficial results.

RELATED: 110 Powerful Quotes To Heal Trauma

28 Journaling Prompts To Learn From Past Trauma

33. "What are the dark feelings within that I am holding on to?"

34. "Can I recognize that this past trauma have actually brought some greatness into my life because of the lessons I have learned?"

35. "Did I realize during the traumatic experience that I was experiencing trauma?"

36. "Am I a better person now before this past trauma?"

37. "Why do I still hold anger and resentment?"

38. "What can I possibly change to move forward from those feelings?"

39. "How have I become better?"

40. "What have I learnt about myself through reflecting on this past trauma?"

41. "Is this anger and resentment doing me any good?"

42. "Do I think of myself as a victim? If yes, why?"

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43. "Is there still healing that needs to take place?"

44. "If yes, what are the actions steps I need to take to move forward?"

Anger Journal Prompts

45. "What is holding me back right now?"

46. "How can I honor myself?"

47. "Have I actually dealt with the emotions that came forward?"

48. "How can I choose to put these changes in action?"

49. "How can I choose to move forward?"

50. "Am I ready to realize that those people who have inflicted trauma on me actually helped me to step up to be a better version of myself?"

51. "Do I hold any anger or resentment towards the person or experience that caused this trauma?"

52. "Do I want to carry this anger and resentment for the rest of my life?"

53. "What triggers these emotions to continuily come forward?"

54. "If not, when did I realize it was inflicting trauma on me?"

55. "Am I ready to move forward and away from the person, place or thing that caused this trauma in my life?"

56. "Do I feel like this past trauma is holding me back from living my life?"

57. "How have I chosen to move forward away from this past trauma?"

58. "Am I in a place where I can honor myself and all that I have gone through this entire experience?"

59. "If no, why am I choosing to hold on to these negative emotions and feelings from this past trauma?"

60. "How have I been able to release and let go?"

Anger Journal Prompts

Emotional Journal Prompts

What are you feeling anxious or worried about right now? Is it rooted in reality?

Write out your life story.

What would you tell your best friend about what you’re feeling right now?

These are just three of the journaling prompts in the category about emotions.

The list includes prompts to encourage you to explore different types of emotions, not only anger.

Much can be learned about ourselves from thinking and writing about our emotions, what causes us to feel certain things, and how we express those emotions.

These are three of my favorites, although to be honest, I really like them all.

What’s one thing you can do to feel better right now?

What is your inner critic saying right now?

What typically triggers a bad mood for you?

When we delve into these sorts of questions we can learn so much about ourselves. It might not be all wonderful, but that isn’t the point of the exercise, is it.

RELATED: 302 Inspiring Daily Habit Quotes To Build A Better Life

30 Emotional Journal Prompts

61. "What do you think would have to happen for you to become the calmest, happiest version of yourself?"

62. "Write through your perfect day from start to finish"

63. "What do you need to let go of?"

64. "Describe what a broken heart feels like to you"

65. "When do you feel the most down or off?"

66. "What are you feeling anxious or worried about right now? Is it rooted in reality?"

67. "What makes you feel sad?"

68. "What are some little things you can do for yourself right now?"

69. "Name five good things that have happened over the past month"

70. "Write out your life story"

71. "Name five things you’re thankful for."

72. "What would you rather be doing right now?"

73. "On a scale of one to ten, how would you rank your mental health right now?"

74. "Why acts tend to mess with your emotions (an example here is too little sleep, sugar, etc.)"

75. "When do you feel the most proud of yourself?"

Anger Journal Prompts

76. "Write about a recent dream you had. What emotions did it bring up for you?"

77. "What is your greatest insecurity? Why?"

78. "When is the last time you felt truly happy?"

79. "What are you most afraid of?"

80. "If you could change one thing, what would it be?"

81. "What’s one thing you can do to feel better right now?"

82. "What is your inner critic saying right now?"

83. "What typically triggers a bad mood for you?"

84. "What is your greatest fear?"

85. "What would you do right now if you knew you could not fail?"

86. "What would you tell your best friend about what you’re feeling right now?"

87. "What makes you feel safe?"

88. "Write about your happiest memory"

89. "How can I be more empathetic?"

90. "What’s one thing you need to let go of?"

Anger Journal Prompts

Frequently Asked Questions

What Are Anger Journal Prompts?

Anger journal prompts are thought-provoking questions or prompts designed to help you explore and manage feelings of anger. They provide a structured way to process your emotions, gain insights, and work towards emotional healing.

How Can Anger Journal Prompts Help With Managing Anger?

Anger journal prompts provide a constructive outlet for expressing and understanding your anger. They encourage self-reflection, helping you identify triggers, patterns, and effective strategies for managing and transforming your anger.

Can Anger Journal Prompts Help In Preventing Outbursts?

Yes, anger journal prompts can aid in preventing outbursts by fostering self-awareness and introspection. They empower you to recognize the early signs of anger, allowing you to implement coping mechanisms before escalation.

Are These Prompts Suitable For People With Different Anger Levels?

Absolutely. Anger journal prompts are designed to accommodate varying levels of anger. Whether you experience occasional frustration or frequent intense anger, these prompts provide an opportunity for self-exploration and growth.

Can Anger Journal Prompts Be Used For Self-Healing?

Yes, these prompts are beneficial for self-healing. They guide you through a process of understanding the underlying causes of your anger, promoting emotional release, and facilitating personal growth.

Continue Reading 👉: 120 Weekly Journaling Prompts To Unlock Your Inner World!

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